All posts by Lisa Rogers

Counseling During the Era of COVID-1

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

COVID-19 has made exploring counseling options a unique and challenging experience. This has become especially challenging for patients concerned about their privacy, with unique challenges and barriers present for patients and for counselors alike.

Despite the challenges, counselors are still able to offer a wide variety of services just as if services were offered in person. There isn’t a need to sacrifice on quality of service due to the session being remote.

Let’s take a look at some of the ways that different areas of the counseling experience have been affected by COVID-19, and how counselors have been able to adapt and overcome.

Ethical Dilemmas With COVID-19

Being able to ensure patient confidentiality when the patient is living with family members can be difficult for both the counselor and for the patient. If a patient wants to talk about experiences with people they live with, it may be unsafe or impossible to do so given stay at home orders and the constant cohabitation of COVID-19.

In the same token, counselors may find themselves dealing with the same challenges – spouses or children in the home – and need to take extra precautions to ensure private patient information remains private.

To counteract some of these challenges, counselors are advising patients to find soundproof places to talk. In addition, white noise machines can be useful for the counselor to use while on calls with patients to ensure no one else in the home can hear. This may even be a valuable tip for the patient to try as well.

Methodology

The methods taken to approach mental health concerns in the COVID-19 area are sometimes just as important as the actual sessions themselves. In part due to the virus, many counselors have begun expanding the ways in which they offer sessions. All of the following are ways that experienced counselors have been practicing telemental health.

  • Email
  • Video Conferencing
  • Online chat
  • Text messaging
  • Phone call

All of these methods give counselors more freedom to break down some of the barriers that prevent people from considering mental health help. When a person may have been too nervous to consider an in-person visit, a text message or email may be less intimidating and more accessible.

Adult Therapy

More and more adult patients are considering the option of counseling due to growing amounts of stress and isolation experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Topics such as unemployment and trauma related to the deaths of loved ones are common themes, which can not only cause burnout in a counselor but lead to some stressful situations adult patients have never had to face before.

Individual counseling is one option available for adults who need to work through one-on-one situations with a licensed practitioner. These sorts of sessions allow for people to heal through their trauma and come to address unresolved conflicts in their life.

For many adults, another important option is couples counseling. This can be offered to either married or dating couples to help mediate conflict resolution and learn how two adults best communicate with each other.

Both of these therapy types are able to be offered virtually. For individual counseling appointments and for couple meetings, video conferencing software is an easy way for the counselor to provide the sort of office space that once existed in person.

Child Therapy

It can be a bit trickier with child therapy in an online environment. For one, if a child has concerns about their family, it may be difficult for them to share if the family is close by. It can also be difficult if the child is struggling with things such as ADHD or Autism, as the technology itself can be one factor leading to their need for counseling.

Group therapy is one option that can be considered, as group calls are able to be done virtually. The same goes for family therapy sessions as those can take place with the family in one (or more) locations and the counselor calling in remotely.

Social skills and play therapy can be a bit harder to do virtually, but tools such as online games and interactive tools can help a counselor best provide services to a child needing specific assistance.

Social skills groups are peer-to-peer focused, so they work especially well in video calls. The goal is to let kids who struggle with connecting to their peers recognize some nonverbal signals of others and improve their impulse control, anger, and practice anxiety management.

Adolescent Therapy

Adolescents, like adult patients, are usually able to have a bit easier access to technology. This access, though, doesn’t mean all challenges are eliminated.

Individual and group therapy, as discussed, are able to be offered through video conferencing softwares. Group therapy may be especially effective for adolescents feeling isolated due to COVID-19. Family therapy again is possible since the counselor can call in to a family in one or more locations.

Substance abuse therapy is usually offered to adolescents struggling with these behaviors, but it can be especially difficult for these adolescents to open up about these issues virtually. However, it is possible with a skilled counselor.

Let Us Help

At Lisa Rogers Counseling, we offer a wide range of therapy and mental health services for several areas. You are not alone in your struggle and neither are your loved ones. Reach out to us today to make an appointment.

Since 1993, I have been providing a combination of all my years of training tailoring specific treatments based on the individual needs and challenges of my patients, facilitating healing. I make every effort to accommodate the busy schedules of my patients by offering evenings, weekend appointments and Telemental Health (Online Counseling-Virtual/Video Conference and Phone Sessions) offered in the following states I am licensed in: New York, California, Illinois, Texas, New Jersey, Florida, and Vermont.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

What are the Seemingly Hidden Signs of Depression?

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

Many of us know what depression is and what the apparent signs are. Prolonged sadness, loss of hope, loss of interest in activities are all common symptoms. These symptoms are commonly listed on mental health websites and in antidepressant ads. But these aren’t the only symptoms. Sometimes symptoms are more subtle, less obvious, but just as important.

These symptoms are just as important as other, more obvious ones, and should be looked out for just the same.

External Symptoms

Depression can show itself in some of the least-expected ways. It can sometimes “find a way out,” when it gets otherwise internalized. Some examples include excessive drinking or drug use, seeking an affair outside of one’s relationship, increased aggression, or withdrawing from those you love.

Some physical symptoms could occur, such as backaches or lowered sex drive. Extreme fatigue, whether mental or physical, is also a significant symptom. The sufferer’s eating habits may also change, either eating too much or too little. Sleep patterns may suffer in the same way.

Lashing Out

In addition to irritability and anger issues, sometimes it goes beyond that. Feeling hopeless or helpless makes it easy to lash out externally when you’re going through something internally.

Sufferers can be sensitive to rejection and display symptoms of hostility. Some of these symptoms can be linked to other disorders, especially if it’s related to anger.

Perfectionism

Depression and perfectionism have a long history of being connected. Having all-or-nothing, rigid, or unrealistically high expectations all indicate perfectionism. These can all relate to depression.

People who are depressed sometimes believe people will only love them if they’re perfect. People with depression also may suffer from low self-esteem that contributes to this kind of thinking.

When you’re a perfectionist, making mistakes may be interpreted as having something deeply wrong with you. Making mistakes is part of life and the role of being human, but those who expect perfection in themselves may view these mistakes as a representation of their inability to measure up.

It is very important to respond to these signs with compassion and support. In many cases, it can be beneficial to seek the services of a mental health professional.

Difficulty Concentrating

Everyone has trouble concentrating once in a while, but it could mean something more if the symptoms are prolonged. When you can’t focus to the point where it affects your work and relationships, it could be a sign of depression.

Most of the time, these symptoms get overlooked as signs of something else, such as ADD, ADHD, or simply the tendency to get distracted. Depression symptoms are often private experiences that the sufferer can hide from others. But concentration issues directly impair functioning. People can miss assignments, deadlines and their work and personal lives can suffer overall.

Because these symptoms are so outward facing, they may be easier to spot than others. However, many people suffer privately, and don’t consider the root cause may be something more deep-seated.

Guilt

We all feel guilt at times. But when you experience deep guilt about many or most areas of your life, it could be a sign of depression. A depressed person may have guilt that consumes them, making them feel guilty about their very being.

It could go as far as feeling guilty about existing — being born in the first place. They may feel guilty about being depressed in general. This can be incredibly debilitating and consume much of their time and energy.

Negativity

We acknowledge some people as having a negative attitude. But it is a sincere issue when someone picks out the negative about everything. This can sabotage a person’s relationships and countless aspects of their life.

Humans naturally pick up on negative aspects to warn them of danger. When you see the negative all the time, all you see is danger. And, over time, this can turn into depression. Someone who is pessimistic can hear something that is good news and immediately find the negative in it. This cycle of negative thinking can cloud one’s thinking and worldview, making it hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel, and feeding into itself by pushing others away and becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Toggling

When you are depressed, sometimes a positive event can bring you out of it for a bit. But you typically return to it. This symptom is often overlooked as something normal or even another disorder. But toggling between depression and brief events that pull you out of it is a significant symptom of clinical depression.

Self-Medicating

Depression often coincides with addiction, as substance abuse is often used to cope. Addiction isn’t just limited to substance abuse, however. Eating disorders and process addictions are other ways in which self-medicating can occur. It’s natural when you’re depressed to want to find convenient ways to eliminate it – as self-destructive or unhealthy as they may be.

The problem is that a depressed person isn’t good at choosing adequate coping mechanisms. Smoking and drinking are more comfortable than going to therapy and exercising. Addictive behaviors, however, only serve to make the situation worse.

Let Us Help

At Lisa Rogers Counseling, we offer a wide range of therapy and mental health services for several areas. You are not alone in your struggle and neither are your loved ones. Reach out to us today to make an appointment.

Since 1993, I have been providing a combination of all my years of training tailoring specific treatments based on the individual needs and challenges of my patients, facilitating healing. I make every effort to accommodate the busy schedules of my patients by offering evenings, weekend appointments and Telemental Health (Online Counseling-Virtual/Video Conference and Phone Sessions) offered in the following states I am licensed in: New York, California, Illinois, Texas, New Jersey, Florida, and Vermont.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

How is Covid-19 Affecting Children’s Mental Health

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

COVID-19 has caused plenty of problems in the world as we know it. The economy has suffered, people are sick, and many are dealing with depression and other disorders that they may or may not have been struggling with before the pandemic.

It’s no surprise that children are suffering from mental challenges as well. With limited social interaction, the struggles of remote learning, the potential for conflict at home, and more, children living in the COVID-19 pandemic are dealing with an increased measure of stress.

Disrupted Routine

Children thrive on predictability when it comes to their home life. School, their parents’ personalities, meal times, and the regular emotions and concerns are now all concentrated in the home environment.

Children, now more than ever, have to deal with uncertainty. They worry about being able to see their friends or relatives, going to school, and, of course, getting sick. These anxieties are difficult for parents to control because there is no simple answer. Parents may also struggle to provide comfort to their children, or even to remain patient at times.

With uncertainty in their everyday lives, compartmentalizing the challenges of the day has become more difficult for both children and parents.

Research and Coping Styles Across the World

Results Based on Coping Styles in China

A survey of 359 children and 3254 adolescents aged 7 to 18 years old during the coronavirus spread in China was conducted in mid 2020. It included a scale for depression, one for anxiety, and one for coping style.

The results showed 22.3 percent of youth had scores indicating symptoms of clinical depression. This is an increase from the usual 13.2 percent of estimated youth depression in China.

Anxiety symptoms had a significant increase after the spread of the pandemic. Youth with friends or family with COVID-19 had higher levels of anxiety than previously reported.

One effective solution was problem-focused coping styles. Studies showed that symptoms decreased when researchers used these methods. Emotion-focused coping styles were associated with higher levels of depression. Therefore, professionals did not recommend them.

Results Based on Age, Gender, and Skills in China

Another survey consisted of 8079 junior and senior high school students in China. The survey assessed depression and anxiety symptoms during the pandemic. They used a Patient Health Questionnaire and a Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire. 43.7 percent of students had anxiety symptoms, and 37.4 percent had depressive and anxiety symptoms.

Depression and anxiety symptoms were the highest in females, and they got higher as the students got older (seniors vs. juniors).

Students who weren’t depressed or anxious often utilized preventive and control measures–whereas those with symptoms largely did not.

Bangladesh

During a lockdown for the pandemic in Bangladesh, a survey was given to 384 parents with children 5-15 years of age. Researchers grouped depression, anxiety, and sleep disorder severities into several categories. They were ranked based on the severity of the issues in the children. Those categories concluded the following:

  • Subthreshold: 43 percent
  • Mild: 30.5 percent
  • Moderate: 19.3 percent
  • Severe: 7.2 percent

Italy and Spain

Researchers performed another assessment on children and adolescents from Italy and Spain. The survey included 1143 parents of children 3-18 years of age who answered questions based on quarantine effects on their children compared to before the quarantine.

The results showed 85.7 percent of parents reported changes in their children’s behaviors and emotions during the quarantine. Those changes included:

  • Difficulty Concentrating: 76.6 percent
  • Boredom: 52 percent
  • Irritability: 39 percent
  • Restlessness: 38.8 percent
  • Nervousness: 38 percent
  • Loneliness: 31.1 percent
  • Uneasiness: 30.4 percent
  • Worry: 30.1 percent

Parents themselves reported feeling stressed as well. Seventy-five percent of them reported feeling worried about quarantine. Parental stress connects to high amounts of reports in emotional and behavioral symptoms in their children.

Predicting the Future

Researchers examined the effects of social isolation and loneliness on mental health in children and adolescents during a systematic review. They examined the connection between loneliness and mental health issues in healthy children to determine if these issues during quarantine will result in future mental health issues.

The review included 63 studies with 51,576 participants. Loneliness and social isolation increased the risk of depression occurring up to 9 years after the cause. Duration, as opposed to the intensity of loneliness, was associated more strongly with mental health symptoms.

Therefore, youth experiencing loneliness during the pandemic may experience mental health issues in the future. Professionals strongly recommend preventive support and early intervention.

Conclusions

The research indicates that many children and adolescents are struggling with depression and anxiety as a result of the pandemic and its cascading effects. Additional research is needed, but there are several things professionals recommend to help the youth.

Clinicians should increase awareness among parents and youth about the potential effects of the pandemic. They should assess the family situation and how everyone is doing emotionally. Early intervention may prevent long-term psychological effects.

For some who already suffer from mental health issues, it could make their problems worse.

For some students who suffer from anxiety at school (such as social anxiety), homeschooling may help relieve their symptoms. However, this could result in similar anxiety when they return to school.

Let Us Help

At Lisa Rogers Counseling, we offer a wide range of therapy and mental health services for several areas. You are not alone in your struggle and neither are your loved ones. Reach out to us today to make an appointment.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

How to Help Someone Get Help With Substance Abuse

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

Substance abuse is a prevalent problem in America. People with substance abuse issues often develop or already are plagued by mental and physical health issues, and their loved ones suffer alongside them in many ways as well.

When someone you love is experiencing drug or alcohol addiction, it’s essential to be able to spot the signs and be prepared to help in a caring and nonjudgmental way.

Signs and Symptoms

There are several signs and symptoms to recognize when someone is struggling with addiction. Some of these include:

  • Appearing intoxicated more often
  • Problems with cognition and memory
  • Attending social events only if there are drugs or alcohol; becoming intoxicated before the social event, or going to fewer social events specifically to drink or use drugs
  • Lethargy, sleeping more, sleeping irregular hours, or appearing sick or tired
  • Neglected appearance and poor hygiene
  • Problems at work or school; sometimes losing one’s job or dropping out of school
  • Lying about the substance or the amount they are using
  • Stealing money or valuables to buy drugs
  • Expressing anger, sadness, or lashing out when asked about their substance abuse
  • Showing withdrawal symptoms when they can’t take the drug

People with substance abuse issues will behave differently when they are intoxicated compared to when they are sober. They may say and do hurtful things and may even take severe risks in their life. These issues can worry their loved ones.

Influence, Not Control

When you love a person with an addiction, you may try to force the person to get help at one point. But even if you talk them into it, they likely fail at their attempt to get better. Addiction is not a controlled choice. It is a compulsion that cannot be deviated without help.

Addiction rewires the reward center of the brain. It causes them to crave the substances and releases chemicals when they do abuse substances.

Because of these factors being out of their control, blaming the victim will get you nowhere. But, loved ones do hold a great deal of influence in the victim’s life.

Staging an intervention by gathering several loved ones together is one thing a loved one can do. Interventions should be planned thoroughly and geared toward helping the addict. Interventions are a positive way to show support for the addict while setting boundaries in the process.

If you sit down with an addict and express your feelings in an exact, calm way, you can still have a great deal of influence. Offering social support repeatedly, information on drug rehabilitation programs, and other healthy methods can inspire the person to get help.

5 Signs of Codependency

Codependent relationships are common when it comes to loved ones of addicts, especially spouses and children. Codependency consists of the desire to help the person and show love but trying to help them fosters addiction. Codependency causes long-term damage.

Signs of codependency include:

1. Taking responsibility for the addict

People in codependent relationships often feel an increased responsibility for their loved ones’ decisions, behaviors, and thoughts. Loved ones may feel a need to make sure their loved one is happy, often to the point of causing unhappiness for themselves. They feel protective of their loved ones. Examples include driving them to and from the bar to avoid a DUI or calling in to work for them when hungover, and making excuses.

2. Putting the addict’s feelings first

A codependent person will put their feelings last. As a result, they will overlook their feelings, values, and beliefs to align with their loved ones. The result is self-neglect.

3. Clinging to the relationship to prevent abandonment

Those who are in a codependent relationship fear abandonment, rejection, and loneliness. Many desperately need approval, and they seek it by always trying to please someone. When that person is an addict, they may give the person money or shelter them when they are under the influence to maintain the relationship.

4. Problems talking about their own feelings.

Someone who is in a codependent relationship might not be able to know their feelings. They have a difficult time discussing their needs and how to fulfill them. Their focus is on helping their loved ones if they are struggling with drug or alcohol addiction instead of helping themselves.

5. Inability to set personal boundaries

Those who are codependent are more likely to agree to anything their loved one asks, even if they are not comfortable with it. This gives the codependent person the belief that they have power over the situation, particularly if their loved one has an addiction. They feel that if they can help their loved ones, they are helping themselves. In reality, they are hurting themselves.

We Can Help

At Lisa Rogers Counseling, we offer a wide range of therapy and mental health services for several areas. You are not alone in your struggle and neither are your loved ones. Reach out to us today to make an appointment.

Since 1993, I have been providing a combination of all my years of training tailoring specific treatments based on the individual needs and challenges of my patients, facilitating healing. I make every effort to accommodate the busy schedules of my patients by offering evenings, weekend appointments and Telemental Health (Online Counseling-Virtual/Video Conference and Phone Sessions) offered in the following states I am licensed in: New York, California, Illinois, Texas, New Jersey, Florida, and Vermont.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Dealing With Grief and Loss During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

Whether due to the virus or another health complication, the experience of losing a loved one during the pandemic is especially painful for many. Due to the restrictions put in place with the intent of preventing the spread of the virus, many were not able to be with their loved ones during their final moments of life.

Furthermore, the loss of the typical communal experience of grief that takes place during funerals or other memorial ceremonies can cause us to feel as though we are forced to process our feelings of sadness over the loss of our loved one alone.

We have all experienced grief and loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic in some way. Grief is typically thought of as the emotional reaction that occurs as a result of the loss of a loved one — but grief can occur as the result of any type of loss.

In addition to loved ones, we can also become emotionally attached to other aspects of our lives, whether it be a job, certain routines and activities, a specific place, or our sense of freedom. Any sort of change to our routine that is beyond our control can trigger a response of grief.

Let us help you understand how to cope with grief and loss that you’ve experienced in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Signs and Symptoms of Grief

In some cases, you may be dealing with negative internal experiences while being unsure of exactly why they are taking place. In order to deal with grief and loss effectively, you must first be able to recognize that this is what you are experiencing.

A few signs that you may be experiencing grief are:

  • Persistent feelings of sadness
  • Anger and irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia or increased sleeping
  • Changes in appetite
  • Inability to stop thinking about the source of grief
  • Trouble concentrating

4 Tips for Dealing with Grief and Loss as a Result of the Pandemic

1. Acknowledge and Accept Your Experience

Because of the plethora of ways the world as we know it has changed for all of us, you may not even know that you are currently struggling with feelings of grief and loss. In addition, you may feel guilt for experiencing these emotions due to knowing that other people have had worse experiences happen to them or much greater losses.

For instance, you might feel bad for being sad about the loss of a vacation or a special event such as a graduation or wedding, knowing that others have had to endure the incredibly painful experience of losing a loved one for good.

No matter the level of loss, grieving is an acceptable emotion. The validity of your grief should not be compared to what others are experiencing. Allow yourself to cry and feel sadness without feelings of guilt. Being able to accept your own emotional response of grief is the first step toward processing your experience in a healthy manner.

2. Connect With Others

Connecting with others virtually can still be a meaningful experience, even if it’s not your preferred way of enjoying the company of your loved ones. Some families who have had to endure the loss of a loved one during the pandemic have held virtual memorial services for their family members.

Although this may not be ideal, having these collective experiences can still be extremely meaningful as a way to grieve collectively and honor the memory of the lost loved one.

You can also connect with others virtually in place of usual in-person activities. Especially if you live alone, try to talk with at least one other person each day to mitigate feelings of isolation and loneliness. Examples of activities you can do with a friend over the phone or video chat include playing a game, watching a movie, or having dinner together.

3. Focus on What You Can Control

Our perceived sense of a loss of freedom or loss of routine can cause a profound sense of grief. However, you still have control over your response to these feelings. Try to monitor and manage your thoughts and recognize when they might be starting to take control.

Activities that can help you manage your thoughts include meditation, deep breathing, exercise, or talking to a loved one. Although it can be difficult to get started, finding joy in a new creative outlet such as cooking, gardening, writing, or painting as a means of self-expression can also be incredibly helpful.

4. Know How to Reach Out for Outside Support

Even with lockdown measures and stay-at-home orders in place, you do not have to go through your experiences of grief alone. Support from a licensed therapist could help you work through the difficult and complicated emotion of grief.

As a result of the restrictions in place due to the pandemic, more and more counseling services are available without even leaving your home via online therapy or phone therapy. Although many people prefer in-person counseling, the accessibility of mental health services online without having to worry about travel time and expenses can be extremely beneficial.

At Lisa Rogers Counseling, we specialize in treatment areas such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse — all of which can be amplified by experiences of grief. Contact Lisa Rogers counseling to schedule a teletherapy appointment today.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

5 Signs You Should Visit a Marriage Counselor

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

Getting married is a wonderful occasion, and marriage can be a great adventure. As time passes, the people involved in the marriage can change and evolve. This can lead to issues, sometimes so impactful that it may involve the need to seek out a counselor. This is a perfectly normal occurrence. Marriage counseling can move you through a negative time so you come out on the other side stronger as a team and more ready to handle other issues in the future.

But, how do you know if it’s the right time for marriage or relationship counseling? It can be tough to notice the signs when you get adjusted to certain things happening in the relationship. Here are a few ways to recognize when it may be time to bring in a counselor to help move through relationship problems.

1. When No One is Talking

If your daily pattern becomes the same: chatting about the kids, bills, or surface level things about your days, this could be a red flag that something is wrong. Sure, there may be days where this is the extent of conversation, but if this carries into weeks or months, it could be time to seek a therapist. Continuing simple conversation into a longer period of time often means neither one of you is looking to discuss a major issue that’s hanging over you.

This is where a marital therapist could help you. They can be the intermediary, ask questions and allow you to figure out the issue and get through it without arguments or strife. In speaking with a marriage counselor, they can assist in learning new ways to speak to and truly hear and understand your spouse. A third party could be what is needed to improve the quality of your conversations.

2. You Never Fight

One would think that if you and your spouse never argue that this is a good thing; nothing could be further from the truth. Every couple will have issues to move past, no matter how much you have in common. Even minor issues arise in every relationship that need to be addressed, and never having this could mean a much larger problem is near.

Never fighting could be the result of a myriad of issues: a parental example, not knowing how to begin a conversation, being concerned about confrontation, and other things could be why. Finding a good marital counselor can help discover the reasons and help work on ways to respectfully discuss problems when they arise.

3. When Your Spouse Becomes the Enemy

Over time, small issues can become larger ones, and you grow to resent your partner. They may have become the enemy in your eyes, where everything they do is a slight against you or they do something to purposely antagonize you. This is a big red flag that the marriage is heading in a bad direction.

When you see your spouse as against you and not supporting you, it can create a “me vs. you” scenario, and the collective relationship severely suffers. A marriage counselor is important in this case, where they can act as an outside observer who can discover the root issue and help remove the resentment.

4. A Life-Changing Event

A major life event, such as a death in the family, a major move, or an empty nest could create problems in any marriage. It’s a time where both spouses tend to react and re-assess most of the things in their lives, and the marriage may take a hit. Issues may come up where maybe there wasn’t one before, leading to larger problems, and larger fights.

Big life changes always become a time where people think about where they go next. Issues that result from this can be a good opportunity to bring in a marriage counselor, where they can learn why these questions are there and put both parties on a path to a positive, growing marriage.

These are only a few reasons why a couple may need to seek out marriage counseling. Finding a therapist that can address their needs well and calmly work out issues that have been plaguing spouses means the marriage continues a strong foundation and a lasting relationship. Through a marital therapist, the couple will learn techniques and strategies to help build a new foundation or build up what was already there to lead both spouses into a helpful, positive, and supportive marriage that will last a lifetime.

5. When You’re At a Crossroads

If you and your spouse are at a crossroads in your relationship for these, or any other, problems, a counselor at Lisa Rogers Counseling will be happy to start you on the path to a better marriage.

At Lisa Rogers Counseling, we offer a wide range of therapy and mental health services for several areas. You are not alone in your struggle and neither are your loved ones. Reach out to us today to make an appointment.

Since 1993, I have been providing a combination of all my years of training tailoring specific treatments based on the individual needs and challenges of my patients, facilitating healing. I make every effort to accommodate the busy schedules of my patients by offering evenings, weekend appointments and Telemental Health (Online Counseling-Virtual/Video Conference and Phone Sessions) offered in the following states I am licensed in: New York, California, Illinois, Texas, New Jersey, Florida, and Vermont.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Signs That a Loved One May Have a Substance Abuse Problem or Addiction

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

Substance addiction plagues many people. Not everyone who engages in substance abuse inherently has an addiction, but the practice of substance abuse can lead to addiction. The reality of being addicted comes as a shock for most sufferers and the people in their lives. 

Many emotions come with the reality that you or a loved one suffer from substance addiction. Most people have difficulty determining whether or not there is a problem.

Addiction involves many factors beyond just being a drug user. Not all situations require a drug treatment program. Rehabilitation programs and support groups are the most common forms of treatment.

If you or your loved one portray any of the signs listed, it could mean you or your loved one are experiencing or are on the path to a drug or alcohol problem.

1. Loss of Interest/Apathy/Complacency

This characteristic isn’t pervasive, however it is noticeable. If someone who is typically active in certain activities, hobbies, talents, skills, or general interests suddenly stops, this could be a warning sign that something is wrong.

This issue may not mean these activities are no longer necessary to them. The problem lies in their focus on their substance abuse problem, snuffing out time spent on other things. 

They may also feel apathetic toward issues that used to concern them. Their concern for their loved ones can taint. 

2. Physical Signs

These are noticeable signs, and there are many of them. Some of these signs include:

  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Dilated pupils
  • Itching
  • Injection marks
  • Puffy face
  • Unusual skin color

If any of these signs become routine, there may be a problem. Sufferers may try to hide these symptoms. If they have become complacent, they may no longer care about hiding the signs. 

3. Appearance 

Regular drug abuse can change someone’s physical appearance. An addict may lose or gain a great deal of weight. Eating habits and times may drastically change.

If apathy has set in, a person who used to care about their appearance may suddenly no longer care. Someone may also change the clothes they wear. If you or someone you know notices any of these signs, there may be a problem.

4. Discovering Drug Paraphernalia 

Several drugs require a tool for their use. Some of these items include:

  • Pipes
  • High Heat or Torch-style lighters or lighters with colored residue on them
  • Bongs
  • Burned spoons
  • Razor blades
  • Cutting surfaces (mirrors or glass)
  • Hypodermic needles
  • Cut straws or rolled up bills

Some other items are not paraphernalia but could be signs. Eye clearing wash or eye drops. This product is used for bloodshot eyes and dilated pupils. Many people own this product that does not have a drug problem. Constant use of these products in itself is not a guaranteed sign, but in conjunction with other items or behaviors listed may be. 

5. Mood Swings

Many things can cause mood swings, and many people experience them regularly. Life changes can cause these, such as changing schools or going through a divorce.

But, if you or a loved one portrays significant changes without apparent cause, it could be a sign of a problem. For instance, if you or someone you know is typically very calm much of the time but suddenly becomes hyper and anxious, something may be going on.

Someone who is typically very happy could suddenly become depressed.

Erratic mood swings from one part of the spectrum to another is another sign of drug abuse or possible mental health issue.

6. Reclusive Behavior

Substance abuse is often very isolating, so the sufferer withdraws from those around them. Some of the signs of withdrawal include:

  • Becoming very private about their life
  • Spending a lot of their time in their room
  • Locking the door to their room when they leave
  • Seeming closed off when questioned

If someone shows any of these symptoms, they may be hiding a sincere problem.

7. Changes in Routine

If someone suddenly changes their behavior, there is likely a problem. These changes could stem from behavior connected to substance abuse. Some of these changes include:

  • Not going to work
  • Cutting class
  • Withdrawing from home life
  • Withdrawing from friends and family
  • Increase in medical conditions, which can cause the prescription of addictive drugs

8. Behavior Changes

Behavior changes can be some of the most apparent signs of addiction. Erratic behaviors specifically are noticeable. They are potentially dangerous, sometimes causing violent actions. People often become violent when going through substance withdrawal, and others are the cause of drug abuse.

This issue becomes complicated when you combine substance abuse with a co-occurring mental health disorder. Someone who is typically depressed might have those feelings amplified with drug abuse.

Additional red flag behaviors include

  • Suddenly being overly sensitive
  • Defensiveness and aggression
  • Becoming verbally or physically abusive 

9. Sleep Changes

Sleeping habits may become erratic. Some of these changes include:

  • Sleeping too much
  • Sleeping very little
  • Oversleeping
  • Change of sleep schedule
  • Sleeping odd hours 

Any or a combination of the signs could be cause for concern.

Let Us Help

Addiction counseling offers a safe, confidential environment that offers the support you need to face the problems you have today.

For adults dealing with substance abuse/addiction, I also offer group therapy as well as support for family members, adolescents and for children dealing with addiction /substance abuse within the family system.

Get the help you need from a trained counselor today.

At Lisa Rogers Counseling, I offer evenings, weekend appointments via Telemental Health (Online Counseling-Virtual/Video Conference and Phone Sessions).

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

What is Child Play Therapy

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

We’ve all seen our children play. They play with dolls, trucks, cars, and crafts. It can be fun to watch or even join in on their play. Many of us think that play is just play, but it is so much more than that.

The way your child plays provides insight into how they interact with others, with their world, and even themselves.

While you may not see these interactions, Child Play Therapists are specially trained to work with children through play. They analyze and relate the play to how your child interacts with others, themselves, and the world.

What types of play do therapists use?

There are multiple types of play a Child Play Therapist uses to allow a child a free and open way of communicating. Once your therapist understands the issues your child is facing, they design specific types of play, play areas, toys, and other items to cue specific play.

The types of play your therapist employs will depend on the child. Most commonly, they use:

  • Nondirective Play Therapy: The therapist observes a child at play without giving any cues or ideas on how the child plays.
  • Puppets, dolls, and playhouses: This encourages pretend play. During pretend play, the child will create a situation or a stressful moment. The therapist can watch and gain insight into what the child may be experiencing emotionally.
  • Directive Play Therapy: The therapist will direct the child to reenact a specific situation, conversation, or other communication types between the child and an outside source (parent/sibling/friend).
  • Drawings: In this play, the therapist will ask a child to interpret drawings to observe emotional responses.
  • Drawing/Painting: This allows the therapist to observe the emotional expression of the child.

These are just a few of the types of play a therapist will use during therapy. Each session is designed specifically for your child based on issues you have indicated and what the therapist has observed in previous sessions.

How does Play Therapy work?

Children are generally referred to play therapy to resolve problems when they’ve exhausted their problem-solving skills. When your child finds that those skills do not resolve the issue, they may begin to act out, misbehave, and have school problems. Play therapy helps children cope with difficult emotions and find solutions to problems.

This allows your child to change the way they think about, feel, and resolve these issues. Play therapy helps to discover alternate ways of resolving problems. With guidance from the therapist, it can be rehearsed and mastered to create lifelong healthy coping strategies.

The benefits of play therapy include:

  • Becoming responsible for behaviors and learning successful strategies
  • Developing new solutions to problems
  • Learning respect and acceptance of others
  • Cultivating empathy and understanding for others
  • Learning social skills and relational skills with friends and family

What can play therapy help with?

There are many issues that play therapy can help your child. A child therapist who specializes in play therapy can identify problems and find creative ways to resolve them.

Some of these issues are:

  • Chronic illness
  • Death in the family
  • Aggressive or angry behavior
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Eating and toilet issues
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Once identified, your therapist uses play to allow your child to express their feelings and direct them to alternative ways of dealing with problems. You may also be included in these sessions. Participating can provide you insight as to what your child is experiencing so you can learn how to communicate with each other better.

Your therapist will decide when and how you may be involved. They will generally stay in regular contact with you to let you know how therapy progresses and help with working through issues with your child.

How do I find a Child Play Therapist?

Child Play therapy is a specialized subset of therapy. It is essential to make sure the therapist you choose has had training and experience in this type of treatment.

Lisa Rogers of Lisa Rogers Counseling has been practicing psychology since 1993. She is an Associate Member of Sandplay Therapists of America and has undergone training for additional types of play therapy. Lisa does in-person as well as telehealth therapy to fit you and your family’s schedule. Let us help your child and your family with a tailored therapy program to resolve issues and create healthier coping mechanisms for your child. Give me a call today.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Why Teletherapy Could Outlast Social Distancing Required of the Covid-19 Pandemic

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

It took a pandemic for teletherapy to become the standard, and now it may be here to stay.

If we have learned anything this year, it’s that there are things you can do from the comfort of your own home that you’d never taken advantage of before. Ordering delivery through Uber, Grubhub, DoorDash, and Postmates has increased exponentially. Online grocery/household items can now be delivered to your door — hassle-free.

Many jobs transitioned to work-from-home status, and some companies have permanently gone remote. Schools have swapped in-person learning for hybrid or virtual learning. Doctors are offering appointments and consultations online as a temporary replacement for in-office visits.

But are these things actually temporary?

As more and more people turn to virtual appointments and teletherapy for their personal needs, doctors are finding that this may become a mainstay for their businesses. Aside from the convenience of providing services to patients at home in light of social distancing, therapists can provide these same services in real-time instead of having a patient wait for an appointment a week, month, or more out.

The pandemic brought about the widespread use of telecommunications for therapy — whether it was needed before the pandemic or as a result. In looking ahead, that practice may be here to stay, and here’s why.

Online Therapy Is More Affordable Overall

Other than the actual session costs, teletherapy provides other financial benefits as well. You don’t have to pay for transportation — gas, transit, etc. — to get to your appointment. You don’t have to find a sitter if you have kids.

Many people, especially younger generations, use the web for their personal and shopping needs and typically do so for discounted rates. You’re saving money by staying home, and who doesn’t love doing both?!

Teletherapy Allows for More Flexibility

Sure, 2020 has slowed everything down, seeing as most people spent much of it at home due to the pandemic. But has it really slowed us down that much? Working from home, maintaining a healthy work-life balance, shopping, and more still cram schedules for the average person. So why should therapy take up more time?

The average time for a therapy session (including transportation to and from) can be over two hours. That’s two hours of time that you could spend more wisely. Teletherapy, backed by some of the top therapists in the country, can cut that time in half or more and allow therapists to fit more patients into their schedules.

Studies show that online therapy is up to 7.8 times faster than face-to-face treatment. Efficient and straightforward is appealing when going through your day. Teletherapy allows for a session to occur on your schedule when it is convenient for you.

You can spend the session outside, on a couch, or in the privacy of your hotel room if you are traveling. There’s no excuse for avoiding therapy because you simply “don’t have the time.”

Teletherapy Provides a Comfortable, Personal Environment

Social distancing in using the web is a bonus factor to the anonymity of doing things digitally. Teletherapy fits into the fast-growing digital landscape in the same way. Sure, therapists occasionally offer home visits, but teletherapy ensures that you are in your element and in a comfortable environment for you.

You’re in your own space. There is no waiting room or therapy couch. The session is completely private. When you get to choose your environment for anything, you generally choose a place that is comfortable and quiet for you. Teletherapy allows for that protection.

Sessions Can Occur in Real-Time

While it may be hard to hand a patient a tissue if they begin crying during a session, there are other benefits to teletherapy in real-time. Say you begin having a panic attack before the session or on a whim, and you can’t get to your therapist in person to handle the situation and ease your tensions.

With teletherapy, you can speak to your therapist while it is happening. Some of these instances may occur on your way to an in-person appointment or at other times, leaving you to recall by memory for your actual session.

Take this example from the New York Times:

The 10-year-old girl was afraid that her American Girl dolls — buried in the bedroom closet — would come alive and attack her. As the girl pointed her iPad at the scary closet door in a remote therapy session, her therapist, Daniela Owen, was able to coach her in real-time to conquer the fear of the dolls.

Something like this wouldn’t be as effective in the office, as the patient wasn’t in the environment that triggered her fears.

The COVID-19 pandemic sent the world into a spiral. It caused so many professionals to reevaluate how they do business and, in turn, how their consumers/clients continue their regular activities.

Many businesses didn’t have any choice but to begin conducting everything virtually. Teletherapy was necessary as a means of safety and social distancing as the pandemic began. When this is all over, virtual businesses will still exist. Improving community health by providing more accessibility and better care is what professionals thrive on.

With adult, adolescent, and child therapy, Lisa Rogers Counseling offers in-person sessions based in New York City while also providing virtual therapy sessions in New York, California, Illinois, Texas, New Jersey, Florida, and Vermont. If you are searching for affordable and effective therapy from home, contact Lisa Rogers Counseling services today!

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

What are the Benefits of Family Therapy

Written by Lisa E. Rogers, MA, LPC, LMFT

Every family is unique — nuclear families, single-parent families, blended families, and so much more. No matter what type of family you have, some challenges require outside help. Family therapy provides a safe space for family members to talk candidly about their feelings, thoughts, opinions, and struggles. Therapy allows each family member to express their thoughts.

With the assistance and leadership of a family therapist, families can understand each other in a way they may not have thought of before. Parents and children learn:

  • why each family member acts the way they do
  • how they best communicate
  • how they can have an open, honest discussion without fear of reproach

Let us show you some of the many benefits you can achieve with family therapy.

4 Benefits of Family Therapy

Benefit #1: Expert Help When You Need It

A family therapist has training and experience in situations that you may be encountering for the first time. They have the skills and knowledge you need to help your family communicate with each other. With a therapist’s help, you can resolve a conflict, deal with a transitional period such as a divorce or death in the family, and strengthen family bonds.

By creating a safe space and offering guidance, the therapist provides specific suggestions to allow each individual to learn to communicate with family members better.

In addition to resolving conflicts between family members, each individual will learn about their strengths and weaknesses. With this knowledge, family members will become better at communicating feelings, reducing stress, and preventing future conflicts.

Benefit #2: Resolve Family Conflict

Conflict between family members is a normal part of family life. Siblings fight with each other, spouses have arguments, and anyone with close contact with the family can create stress.

There are many types of conflicts a family therapist is trained to help with. Some of the most common ones are:

  • Child behavioral issues
  • Death of a family member or close friend
  • Depression and anxiety in individual members of the family
  • Marital conflicts
  • Conflicts between a child and a family member
  • Substance abuse
  • LGBTQ issues

These are just a few common issues that families face. A family therapist is trained in multiple types of conflicts, issues, and problems between family members and the family as a whole.

Benefit #3: Proven Methods

When you first begin family therapy, your therapist will take an assessment of your family dynamic. They may use a questionnaire to go through your family history and your reasons for seeking therapy.

Others prefer to discuss the reasons you’re seeking therapy and let the conversation flow from there. Your therapist wants to get a full and clear picture of the family dynamic and any issues each person has within the family unit.

Sometimes, your therapist might suggest additional therapy services for family members. These additional services could include individual therapy for family members. For couples, they may suggest relationship and marriage counseling. When these methods are combined, they can help facilitate deeper relationships within families.

Benefit #4: Customized Therapy Programs

Once you’ve done the initial consultation, your therapist will create a therapy program for your family. A therapist uses multiple techniques to help a family during therapy. Some techniques are:

  • Cognitive Therapy: Helping individuals understand how they think about things can affect the way they feel emotionally.
  • Play Therapy: This is for children under the age of 13. During play therapy, the therapist observes and gains insight into a child’s problems. This therapy helps the child to explore emotions and deal with unresolved trauma.
  • Crisis Mitigation: The therapist guides clients through a family crisis and transitional periods such as divorce or a death in the family.
  • Behavior Issues: Evaluate and replace dysfunctional behaviors by providing healthy alternatives.

These techniques encourage healthy behaviors in family members to resolve conflict or stress. By guiding a family with these techniques (and others), they can create better communication between family members. The individuals also gain valuable insight into themselves and gain confidence in communicating with others.

How to Prepare for Family Therapy

Now that you know how helpful family therapy can be, there are some steps you can take to prepare your family.

Everyone may not be excited to attend family therapy sessions. You can provide support and guidance before you start to help ease worries, objections, and questions about it.

Children especially may be resistant to the idea, worrying that something is wrong or that they will be judged. The best way to help them understand is by having a candid conversation and letting them know what they can expect.

  • Discuss why you feel that therapy will help them individually as well as the family.
  • Focus on working to find solutions and build strength for the family.
  • Learn to be positive and supportive.

Engage the entire family by working together to identify issues and stressors individuals are feeling. Write these down and take them with you when meeting with the therapist. This list will help them to understand where everyone in the family is feeling stress and tension. Your list can also be the beginning of recognizing issues you weren’t aware of.

If age appropriate, encourage family members to think of issues they want to address and how they will approach them. Your therapist will help you communicate so the other person doesn’t get angry or defensive.

Find the Right Therapist for Your Family

Finding the right therapist for your family is important. You want to make sure they are trained in the issues you’re facing. I have been practicing marriage and family, helping families, individuals, couples, adolescents, and children face their challenges and heal from traumas. Lisa tailors specific treatments based on the needs and challenges of her patients and offers both in-person and telehealth appointments, providing the flexibility to work within each family’s schedule. Don’t be afraid to take the first step. Reach out to me at Lisa Rogers Counseling to schedule an initial appointment today, and start your journey.

Lisa Rogers Counseling

Accepting New Patients:

  • Adult
  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Individual, Group, Family and Couples therapy

Teletherapy (Video/Phone) appointments now available:

646-599-3865

Key image for Lisa Rogers Counseling

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

Contact

Lisa E. Rogers M.A., L.P.C., L.M.F.T.

Phone: 646-599-3865

New York City Locations

208 E 51st St #264
New York, NY 10022
(Mail ok)*

245 5th Ave 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10016 
(Do not send mail to this address)*

18 E 41st St, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(No mail)*

115 Broadway #1800
New York, NY 10006
(Do not send mail to this address)*

Other Locations Served

1302 Waugh Dr #111
Houston, TX 77019

188 Shopping Plaza Rd #240
Rutland, VT 05701

Teletherapy Locations

New York – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #001034
California – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #LMFT43013
Texas – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #201088
Texas – Licensed Professional Counselor #19332
Illinois – Licensed Professional Counselor #178.000647
Vermont – Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist #100.0130890
New Jersey – Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #NJDCATEMP-000577
Florida- Licensed Marriage Family Therapist #MT3903

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Email: Lisa@LisaRogersCounseling.com
Appointments made by phone only. Please do not email confidential information
Flexible appointment times available:Evenings and Saturdays available.
Virtual and Phone Sessions Available
(HIPAA Compliant)***
In case of an emergency please contact your local Hospital, call 911 or The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.